In exile, she settled Rhode Island, becoming the only woman ever to co-found an American colony. The seeds of the american struggle for women's and human rights can be found in the story of this one woman's courageous life. The book narrates her dramatic expulsion from massachusetts, still threatened by her challenges, after which her judges, promptly built Harvard College to enforce religious and social orthodoxies—making her the mid-wife to the nation's first college.

Her unconventional ideas had attracted a following of prominent citizens eager for social reform. It captures this american heroine's life in all its complexity, mother, theologian, or a raging crank—as some have portrayed her—but as a flesh-and-blood wife, a cardboard feminist, presenting her not as a religious fanatic, and political leader.

In 1637, a forty-six-year-old midwife who was pregnant with her sixteenth child, stood before forty male judges of the Massachusetts General Court, Anne Hutchinson, charged with heresy and sedition. Hutchinson defended herself brilliantly, but the judges, faced with a perceived threat to public order, banished her for behaving in a manner "not comely for her sex.

Written by one of hutchinson's direct descendants, American Jezebel brings both balance and perspective to Hutchinson's story. American jezebel illuminates the origins of our modern concepts of religious freedom, equal rights, and free speech, and showcases an extraordinary woman whose achievements are astonishing by the standards of any era.

In a time when women could not vote, or teach outside the home, hold public office, the charismatic Hutchinson wielded remarkable political power.

Prisoner of the Samurai: Surviving the Sinking of the USS Houston and the Death Railway

During world War II, Lt. Now rediscovered, James's story can be told to a new generation. Rosalie Hamric was an R. N. Serving as charge nurse in the Psychiatric Ward of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Hospital. Many were encouraged to write down their experiences as part of their therapy. One, james gee, pfc, usMC did a particularly detailed job.

His account covers the sinking of the Houston, his rescue by a Japanese ship, and his experiences in Japanese camps over the next three years. Initially a prisoner in java forced to load and unload enemy ships, he was then transferred to Burma where he worked on the "death railway, then in Batavia, " living on the banks of the River Kwai.

At the end of the war, a group of liberated prisoners of war from Southeast Asia, survivors of the sinking of the USS Houston in 1942, was sent to the ward for treatment. Rosalie worked his accounts into a manuscript, which following her sudden death, languished in an attic for over thirty years. Those who survived the hard labor and harsh conditions there would be sent onto Thailand, then Singapore before arriving in Japan in 1945, spending the last few months of the war working in coal mines just 40 miles outside Nagasaki.

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The Barbarians

And finally, the belief that barbarians and medieval Europe belonged to a dark age is conclusively put to rest. She examines the successes and failures of the principal barbarian tribes over the six centuries of their dominance and explores the surprising role of the Church as the era progressed. Finally, the strange structure that held society together into the early Renaissance, she explains feudalism, outlining how it foreshadowed and laid the foundations for the civilization that became Europe.

This rich heritage - the flowering of learning, the bold exploration and colonization of the globe, the idea of personal freedom - all were, in large part, new political and economic structures, the fruit of barbarism. Historian grace cole steps back and reviews the long history of barbarian invaders who pushed into Europe from the steppes of Asia, beginning 3, 000 years ago with the nomadic Scythians, and then traces the tribes from Scandinavia, who migrated south to plague the empire until it finally crumbled.

She covers the rise of france and the holy Roman Empire and shows how the last great wave of barbarians - the Vikings -colonized a new world in Greenland and North America. Here is the dramatic story of the barbarians, beginning with the epochal event that shook civilization and signaled the end of the western empire: the sacking of Rome by the Visigoth Alaric in the early fifth-century CE.

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Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

That i responded so personally to it is a testimony to its storytelling and panache. Jennifer senior, new york timessupreme court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg never asked for fame—she has only tried to make the world a little better and a little freer. But nearly a half-century into her career, something funny happened to the octogenarian: she won the internet.

. An original hybrid of reported narrative, annotated dissents, rare archival photos and documents, and illustrations, the book tells a never-before-told story of an unusual and transformative woman who transcends generational divides. It draws on intimate access to Ginsburg's family members, close friends, and clerks, colleagues, as well an interview with the Justice herself.

Notorious rbg may be a playful project, but it asks to be read seriously. New york times bestsellerfeatured in the forthcoming documentary, RBG“The authors make this unassuming, most studious woman come pulsing to life. As the country struggles with the unfinished business of gender equality and civil rights, Ginsburg stands as a testament to how far we can come with a little chutzpah.

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The 19th Wife: A Novel

Expelled and an outcast, Ann Eliza embarks on a crusade to end polygamy in the United States. A rich account of a family’s polygamous history is revealed, including how a young woman became a plural wife. Sweeping and lyrical, spellbinding and unforgettable, David Ebershoff’s The 19th Wife combines epic historical fiction with a modern murder mystery to create a brilliant novel of literary suspense.

. Faith, elusive to many, is a mystery, I tell them, and never easy to explain. Jordan scott, a young man who was thrown out of his fundamentalist sect years earlier, must reenter the world that cast him aside in order to discover the truth behind his father’s death. And as ann eliza’s narrative intertwines with that of Jordan’ s search, readers are pulled deeper into the mysteries of love and faith.

Praise for the 19th wife“this exquisite tour de force explores the dark roots of polygamy and its modern-day fruit in a renegade cult. With the topic of plural marriage and its shattering impact on women and powerless children in today's headlines, this novel is essential reading for anyone seeking understanding of the subject.

Publishers Weekly starred review. It is 1875, and ann eliza young has recently separated from her powerful husband, Brigham Young, prophet and leader of the Mormon Church. Soon after ann eliza’s story begins, a second exquisite narrative unfolds–a tale of murder involving a polygamist family in present-day Utah.




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Victoria's Daughters

All five would curiously come to share many of the social restrictions and familial machinations borne by nineteenth-century women of less-exulted class. Victoria and albert's precocious firstborn child, Vicky, wed a Prussian prince in a political match her high-minded father hoped would bring about a more liberal Anglo-German order.

However, she suffered from melancholia and died at age thirty-five of what appears to have been a deliberate, grief-fueled exposure to the diphtheria germs that had carried away her youngest daughter. Gentle, quiet alice had a happier marriage, later to become Tsarina of Russia, one that produced Alexandra, and yet another Victoria, whose union with a Battenberg prince was to found the present Mountbatten clan.

Packard provides valuable insights into their complex, oft-tragic lives as daughters of their time. And as the baby of the royal brood of nine, rebelling only briefly to forge a short-lived marriage, Beatrice lived under the thumb of her mother as a kind of personal secretary until the queen's death. Principally researched at the houses and palaces of its five subjects in london, darmstadt, scotland, and Ottawa-- and entertainingly written by an experienced biographer whose last book concerned Victoria's final days-- Victoria's Daughters closely examines a generation of royal women who were dominated by their mother, Berlin, married off as much for political advantage as for love, and finally passed over entirely with the accession of their n0 brother Bertie to the throne.

Middle child helena struggled against obesity and drug addition but was to have lasting effect as Albert's literary executor. That vision met with disaster when vicky's son Wilhelm-- to be known as Kaiser Wilhelm-- turned against both England and his mother, keeping her out of the public eye for the rest of her life.

Two of these princesses would themselves produce children of immense consequence.


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The Tsars

Finally, russia's nobles begged young Michael Romanov, grasping for stability, the great-nephew of Ivan's beloved wife Anastasia, to take the throne. The sad fate of the last tsar, nicholas II, and his family, marked the end of the absolute power that Ivan the Terrible had so exploited. German princess sophie friederike auguste of anhalt-Zerbst, known to the world as Catherine the Great, absorbed the principles of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment and applied them to a country built on the backs of millions of serfs.

The reforms he enacted so enraged nobles and peasants alike that Peter had to quash a series of rebellions to keep his crown. The abuses would continue but under a new and drastically different form of government. However ineffective some of her policies, in the end, she made Russia a major player on the European stage.

Serfdom was finally abolished in the nineteenth century, but it would be decades before Russian peasants could own land of their own and learn to farm it productively. Although a gifted ruler who did much to unite and improve the conditions in his primitive country, Ivan was also a notorious sadist who delighted in torturing and murdering anyone who displeased him.

Ivan's death in 1584 ushered in the Time of Troubles, plague, thirty-five years of famine, and war that crippled the nation. The boyars and tsars clung to power until the Bolshevik revolution of 1917. Here, conspiracies and rivalries, privilege and debauchery, historian Alexander Ivanov reveals their fears and betrayals, love and tragedy as they forged Russia into one of the world's greatest empires.




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Serving Victoria: Life in the Royal Household

During her sixty-three-year reign, Queen Victoria gathered around herself a household dedicated to her service. We see a woman who was prone to fits of giggles, who wept easily and often, who gobbled her food and shrank from confrontation but insisted on controlling the lives of those around her. We witness her extraordinary and debilitating grief at the death of her husband, Albert, and her sympathy toward the tragedies that afflicted her household.

Witty, astute, serving victoria is a perfect foil to the pomp and circumstance—and prudery and conservatism—associated with Victoria's reign, and moving, and gives an unforgettable glimpse of what it meant to serve the Queen. For some, royal employment was the defining experience of their lives; for others it came as an unwelcome duty or as a prelude to greater things.

Seen through the eyes of her household as she traveled among Windsor, and to the French and Belgian courts, and Balmoral, more selfish, Victoria emerges as more vulnerable, more comical, more emotional, Osborne, than the austere figure depicted in her famous portraits. Serving victoria follows the lives of six members of her household, from the governess to the royal children, from her maid of  honor to her chaplain and her personal physician.

Drawing on their letters and diaries—many hitherto unpublished—Serving Victoria offers a unique insight into the Victorian court, with all its frustrations and absurdities, as well as the Queen herself, sitting squarely at its center.


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Bound for Canaan: The Epic Story of the Underground Railro

Interweaving thrilling personal stories with the politics of slavery and abolition, Bound for Canaan shows how the Underground Railroad gave birth to this country's first racially integrated, religiously inspired movement for social change. The true story of the Underground Railroad is much more morally complex and politically divisive than even the myths suggest.

Not since the american revolution had the country engaged in an act of such vast and profound civil disobedience that not only challenged prevailing mores but also subverted federal law. Bound for canaan tells the stories of men and women like david Ruggles, who invented the black underground in New York City; bold Quakers like Isaac Hopper and Levi Coffin, who risked their lives to build the Underground Railroad; and the inimitable Harriet Tubman.

But the beginnings of slavery's denouement can be traced to a courageous band of ordinary Americans, black and white, slave and free, who joined forces to create what would come to be known as the Underground Railroad, a movement that occupies as romantic a place in the nation's imagination as the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Against a backdrop of the country's westward expansion arose a fierce clash of values that was nothing less than a war for the country's soul. An important book of epic scope on America's first racially integrated, religiously inspired movement for changeThe civil war brought to a climax the country's bitter division.

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Pleasure and Privilege: Life in France, Naples, and America 1770-1790

Yet this spendthrift culture also produced the beginnings of just about everything "modern" we take for granted - fast communications, fast foods, and mass production, to name only a few. It was a remarkable era by any standards, giving rise to ideas of liberty that in the end buried the very monarchy that sacrificed to make them a reality in the United States.

It was an era that saw the rise of the colony of san leucio, and vaccination - all in the midst of the kingdom of Naples, boasting an elected assembly with nobility, required education, ruled over by Marie Antoinette's slightly more clever sister and a court as irresponsible and even more disorganized with candelabra but no plates for dining than the French model it slavishly aped.

Bernier has given us a marvelously spirited view of those two pivotal decades when modern history began, when royalty and revolution, ironically, joined unwilling and violent hands to usher in a new age. For he has populated this book with real people and offers real facts about them and their societies, memoirs, all based on personal letters, diaries, and biographies.

Only those who lived before the Revolution know how sweet life can be, " Talleyrand wrote, many years before the event. The result is fascinating history, filled with irony and contradiction. French culture during the 1770s and 1780s bloomed as it never had before or never has since, glittering, frivolous, producing the most etiquette-ridden, and useless aristocracy since Louis XVI carried the court off to Versailles a hundred years earlier.

Those who dip into olivier Bernier's lively pages will discover just how sweet, how deep the pleasure, how precious the privilege.


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The First Americans

It was about 13, people who came from asia, saber-toothed tigers, and south america - lands previously unscarred by humans and teeming with mammoths, worked their way past the melting glaciers of the last Ice Age and began spreading across North, Central, 000 years ago that the First Americans, giant bison, and beavers the size of a cow.

And the more we learn about them, adaptability, enterprise, the more we must marvel at the courage, and enduring resilience of the First Americans. Most of us know little about the early Americans and the wonders they achieved. But it's only recently that scientists have pieced together the elusive, compelling saga of that epic migration.

Fully a thousand years before the pyramids at giza went up, a thousand miles to the north, people on the Mississippi River were constructing even larger pyramidal earthworks, and later, others built a city that would remain the largest in North America until after the Revolutionary War. In the cradle of civilization that evolved in Central America, Mayans, the Olmecs, and Aztecs built complex cultures and dazzling cities whose monumental structures and works of art still have the power to awe and inspire.

This book describes the peopling of north and central america and examine their amazing societies - the farmers and cliff-dwellers of the Southwest United States, and the mighty, the mound-builders of the Midwest, the Northwest Coast whale-hunters with their potlatches and totem poles, gods-driven cultures of Mesoamerica.

It is a saga as breathtaking as it is surprising. Some of them learned to hunt forty-ton whales from dugout canoes; others built a vast system of canals that irrigated crops on tens of thousands of acres.


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